FAQs

A New Puppy!
Dog Article courtesy of I-Love-Dogs.com

So you got a new puppy, now what? Do you know what kind of puppy you have? Playful? Protective? Outgoing? Shy? Well, whatever puppy you have, you can use these helpful puppy hints to connect with your new member of the family. Just remember that if you want your new puppy to obey, respect, and love you, then you need to never ever hurt your puppy. Your new puppy needs to feel safe and secure. If you hit him, him he will be to scared to obey you, which could lead to other behavior problems like house breaking. Make sure your children are not hitting the puppy, too, because he is more likely to bite you or them in self defense if you hit him.

Reinforce your puppy's good behavior. Praise and treats are always a good way to do just that. Good behavior such as peeing outside, sitting when told to, no barking in the house, etc. Food is a good motivator also. Puppies learn more easily when food is involved because it is more satisfying then toys at that point. Use part of their daily intake so as to not over feed your new puppy, therefore keeping your new dog healthy while training him. If you need to punish your puppy do not yell, use a lack of attention. Puppies thrive on attention so when you don't pay attention to them that is more then punishment enough.

House train your new puppy as soon as possible. Be consistent! Patience is an absolute must! Your puppy needs time to learn, so remember, accidents happen. Make sure your puppy socializes. This is important because you can have a well-behaved puppy if you get him into some proactive socializing early on. Your puppies most impressionable period, just like children, is when they are young, birth to sixteen weeks. So make sure you are doing all you can to help acclimate your dog to society.

Make sure you handle your puppy every day. Such as brushing, baths, toenails being clipped, ear cleaning are just a few. Also examining and brushing your puppies teeth should be on your list of dos for a healthy dog. Your ultimate goal is to have your puppy comfortable and have him look forward to being handled by you or your children. A stressed out dog is no fun for you or the dog, so make sure your puppy gets used to the attention. Make sure you use treats to praise your pup for good behavior during this time. Be gentle; they respond to kindness and tender care more so then harsh words.

Start training your dog not to bite early on in life. Have your whole household be part of this training. It is natural for a dog to want to bite; they have done it since the beginning of time. But it only takes some simple steps to keep your puppy playful but not dangerous. Try playing with your pooch, getting him to bite you, when he does it too hard, say, "Ouch!" really loud and let it startle him. Stop playing with him for a few minutes and then start over until he learns to play nicely without hurting you or your children. After practicing this for a few weeks, your pup should be thinking that humans couldn't stand the touch of teeth at all.

Teaching your new puppy what is ok and not ok to chew on is very important. You would like to keep your good shoes good, right? Well, make sure you teach your pup the ways of your household, ensuring a happy puppy and happy owner. When you catch him chewing on something he isn't supposed to, (face it you will)...say loudly, "NO!" Startle him into not chewing on that item. Hand him a chew toy to chew on instead. Praise him for chewing on his toy and he will be more then happy to chew it into oblivion.

Just remember to give your puppy lots of love. They need it to grow up happy, healthy, and obedient.


Puppy Proofing Your Home!
Dog Article courtesy of I-Love-Dogs.com

Puppies are super cute and so much fun to have around. They are filled with energy and curious about everything around them. It is your job as a responsible pet owner to puppy proof your house to make it safe from them and to protect your belongings.

The first thing you should do when puppy proofing your house is to go room to room on your hands and knees. Look at the things in your home from your puppy's perspective. Think about what is at that level that may be interesting to him. You may be surprised to find many things that are potentially dangerous that you never even thought of before.

One thing you should be aware of in your household is the location of electrical cords. Make sure to limit your puppy's access to these areas. Puppies can chew through cords and get electrocuted causing serious injury or even death. Wrap cords up and store them away or lay down rubber or plastic runners that can be purchased at most home supply stores.

Another potentially dangerous thing for puppies is your stairs. Small puppies have a hard time navigating up and down stairs and could fall down them and injure themselves. Stairs also lead to areas in your house that may be off limits. The best way to ensure that your puppy stays away from the stairs is to purchase baby gates, available at most department and pet supply stores.

Just as curious toddlers are, puppies are very curious about what is inside cabinets. Many people store cleaning supplies and personal care products in cabinets that can be accessible to puppies. These kinds of products contain harmful ingredients that can injure or kill your puppy. Make sure to either store these products in cabinets that are out of reach to puppies, or purchase plastic cabinet locks that are available at most department and pet supply stores.

Be aware of small objects that are located around the home, on coffee tables and other surfaces that are accessible to your puppy. Just as with small children, puppies can choke on items like coins, needles, jewelry and small toys. Make sure to keep these kinds of items out of your puppy's reach.

Puppies seem to be attracted to shoes and socks. They love to chew on them. Not only will this ruin your favorite shoes, if a puppy were to chew on and swallow a shoelace or a sock, it could get wrapped around their intestines causing serious injury or death. Make sure to store your shoes and socks out of reach of your puppy, and NEVER encourage them to chew on these items, no matter how cute it may be.

Always limit your puppy's access to the bathroom. Bathroom garbage is very tempting to chew on. If your dog were to swallow some dental floss or feminine products, this could be very harmful to them. Puppies also are curious about toilets. Small pups could fall in an open toilet and drown. Make sure to keep your bathroom door shut at all times, or install a baby gate at the entrance to your bathroom. The same can be said for the kitchen and kitchen garbage.

Open windows are another potential hazard to your puppy. Being very curious about the world around them, they could easily fall out of a window causing serious harm or death. On the ground floor, they could exit out of the window and get lost or run into the street. Be mindful of open windows when you are not directly supervising your puppy.

House plants are another concern when it comes to puppies. Most dogs are very attracted to plants and many household plants are toxic to animals and can cause nausea, vomiting, and in some cases, death. Always make sure to keep house plants away from your puppy's reach.

The best way to puppy proof your house is to crate train your puppy right away. You are providing him with a safe place to go whenever he wants to as well as a place to be safely contained when you are not able to directly supervise him. If you need more information about puppy proofing your home, consult your veterinarian or pet professional.


Ten Household Items That May Kill Your Dog!
Dog Article courtesy of I-Love-Dogs.com

Dogs are very curious animals and as omnivores and natural scavengers, can get into and eat just about anything. However, there are many toxic substances found in your home that could potentially kill your dog. The following is a list of ten common household substances that you should make sure to keep out of your dog's reach.

1) Antifreeze: Many people do not realize it, but common antifreeze kills many pets each year. It smells and tastes very sweet to your dog and is very appealing to him. Ethylene glycol is toxic however, and each winter, many animals are killed by it. Symptoms of toxicity include seizures, vomiting, stumbling and lethargy leading to kidney failure. Make sure to keep your antifreeze out of your dog's reach. If you suspect that your dog has ingested antifreeze, take your dog to the veterinarian immediately.

2) Chocolate: Chocolate contains a substance called the obromine which is toxic to dogs. Baking chocolate and dark chocolate is especially dangerous. While it usually takes a somewhat large amount of chocolate to kill a dog, poisoning and death does occur with smaller amounts ingested. Signs of chocolate poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, increased urination, and increased activity. This can progress to seizures and unusual heart rhythms. Call your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your dog has eaten chocolate.

3) Bleach: As you might imagine, household bleach is toxic to dogs. Keep all products containing bleach out of your dog's reach. Symptoms of bleach poisoning include drooling, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Do NOT induce vomiting if you suspect your dog has ingested bleach and contact your veterinarian immediately.

4) Tylenol: As little as two regular strength Tylenol tablets can kill a small dog. Dogs lack the proper liver enzymes to break down acetaminophen. Signs of toxicity include drooling, lethargy, and abdominal pain. If you suspect your dog has ingested Tylenol, call your veterinarian immediately.

5) Watch Batteries: If your dog ingests a watch battery, it can cause a potentially fatal ulceration in the stomach within 12 hours. All other alkaline batteries are toxic to dogs as well. Symptoms of toxicity include drooling, lack of appetite, vomiting, and lethargy. If you suspect your dog has ingested a watch battery, contact your vet immediately.

6) Moth Balls: Moth balls are very dangerous to dogs. They contain an insecticide that causes central nervous system excitement and seizures. When metabolized, ingestion of moth balls can lead to liver failure. Symptoms of poisoning by moth balls include vomiting and seizures. If your dog has consumed moth balls, do NOT induce vomiting. Seek veterinary care immediately.

7) Fabric Softeners and other detergents: All sorts of household detergents are toxic to dogs at one level or another, but fabric softeners fall into the highly toxic category. Signs of toxicity include vomiting, lethargy, burns to the mouth, drooling, muscle weakness, and even coma. Do NOT induce vomiting if your dog has ingested any detergent. Contact your veterinarian immediately.

8) Mouthwash: Mouthwash can contain boric acid which is highly toxic to dogs. Symptoms of poisoning by mouthwash include vomiting, drooling, seizures, and coma. You should take your dog to the veterinarian immediately if you suspect poisoning by mouthwash or other household item containing boric acid like contact lens solution or denture cleaner.

9) Peach Pits: With most fruits, the pits and the seeds are toxic to dogs. Signs of poisoning include drooling, vomiting, and lethargy. If you suspect your dog has eaten a peach pit or the pit or seeds of any fruit, take him to the veterinarian immediately.

10) Household Plants: Many common and popular household plants are highly toxic to dogs. A partial list of toxic plants includes poinsettias, lilies, ferns, devil's ivy, aloe, and ivy. Symptoms of poisoning due to ingestion of toxic plants include vomiting and central nervous system excitement. Many of these plants are fatal if ingested. Please contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your dog has eaten a toxic houseplant.

With diligence on our part, we can help prevent our dogs from getting into substances that are toxic to them. Many veterinary school websites offer lists of things that are toxic to dogs and what you should do if your dog ingests such things. As always, if you think your dog may have eaten something dangerous, contact your veterinarian immediately or take your dog to the closest emergency clinic.


Pets and Poisons
Common Household Items Can Be Poisonous To Pets

PLEASE NOTE:
Information on this page may change without notice to ThePetCenter.com. Therefore ThePetCenter.com cautions you to update your own information regarding emergency numbers and contact personnel such as your veterinarian, local physician and emergency care offices.

Presented by ThePetCenter.com
With permission from Dana Farbman, Senior Manager of Client & Professional Relations ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center
If your pet has come into contact with a potential toxin...leave your computer and call your veterinarian immediately!
Or call the ANIMAL POISON CONTROL CENTER
888-4ANI-HELP (888-426-4435)
$50 fee may be applied to credit card

Thousands of dogs and cats needlessly suffer and many die each year by accidental ingestion of household poisons, including pesticides, popular houseplants, medications and common foods. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, the only animal poison control center in North America offers advice to pet owners about the many household products that can be dangerous and even deadly to their four-legged family member. Grapes, raisins, chocolate, cocoa, onions, and macadamia nuts can kill them or make them very sick. Read about it at Snopes.com Mothballs, potpourri oils, coffee grounds, homemade play dough, fabric softener sheets, dishwashing detergent, batteries, cigarettes, alcoholic drinks, pennies and hand and foot warmers could be dangerous for your pet. Keep all prescription and over-the-counter medications out of your pets' reach, preferably in closed/locked cabinets above the counter. Painkillers, cold medicines, antidepressants, vitamins and diet pills can be lethal to animals, even in small doses. Read all of the information on the label before using a product on your pet or in your home. If a product is for use only on dogs, it should never be used on cats; if a product is for use only on cats, it should never be used on dogs. Be aware of the plants you have in your home and yard. The ingestion of azalea, oleander, sago palm or yew plant material by your pet can be fatal. Easter lily, day lily, tiger lily and some other lily species can cause kidney failure in cats. Make sure your pets do not go on lawns or in gardens treated with fertilizers, herbicides or insecticides until they have dried completely. Always store such products in areas that are inaccessible to your pets. If you are uncertain about the usage of any product, ask the manufacturer and/or your veterinarian for instructions. Be alert for antifreeze/coolant leaking from your vehicle. Animals are attracted to the sweet taste and ingesting just a small amount can cause an animal's death. Consider using animal-friendly products that use propylene glycol rather than those containing ethylene glycol.When using rat, mouse, snail or slug baits, or ant or roach traps, place the products in areas that are inaccessible to your pet. Some bait contains sweet smelling inert ingredients, such as jelly, peanut butter or sugar that can attract your pets.Call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) if you suspect that your pet has ingested something poisonous.